The Wise Choice Process: Proactive or Reactive

The wise choice process is an exceptional tool to use with struggling students. If you are not familiar with this process, it is introduced in the text On Course: Strategies for Creating Success in College and in Life by Skip Downing.

The Wise Choice process has six steps:

  1. What is my present situation?
  2. How would I like my situation to be?
  3. What are my possible choices?
  4. What’s the likely outcome of each possible choice?
  5. Which choice(s) will I commit to doing?
  6. When and how will I evaluate my plan?

My first experience with utilizing the wise choice process was with a student after they had stopped persisting for a time and had returned to class. In other words, I was using the process as a reactive tool after a student had already experienced the consequences of making poor choices.

The more I considered the wise choice process and what it represented, I decided to utilize the process as a proactive exercise earlier in each semester.

During the first week of each course, I now ask my students to consider any “fork in the road” they MAY encounter during the semester. This could be transportation concerns, financial hardships, loss of childcare, assumed difficulty with the academic rigor of the course, etc.  I then ask the students to work through The Wise Choice Process making a plan for addressing their circumstance – in advance! As part of that plan, they are provided with a copy of all available students services and are asked to include at least one student service they could utilize to aid in their situation.

Note: the purpose of this activity is to encourage the students to make a plan for how they will respond in advance of the hardship actually occurring. I have found when a student has a plan for how to deal with a possible “fork in the road” in advance, they are less likely to be thrown off course when the circumstance happens, then if they had made no plan at all. Additionally, is a circumstance does cause the student to get off course, they generally stay off course for a shorter period of time.

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