Food for Thought on Successful Communication and Conflict Resolution

Always remember:  Don’t allow personal attacks AND don’t personalize remarks.  This can be very challenging as everyone’s first response to “personalize” the situation.  A key tool in any learning environment is successful and respectful interaction with learners (and the work / team environment too!!!).  When communicating (verbally, in writing, or face to face) and corresponding with learners (colleagues) about “heated moments” It is prudent to ‘depersonalize’ the communication /correspondence by not using “you” and “I” but referencing the “issue” and the “course of action or resolution”. 

For example if a student email states “You gave me a 69% on the last quiz and I don’t think it was fairly graded.”    A response might look something like this:  “Thank you for the email inquiry regarding performance on the LP 6 quiz.  In review of the quiz, questions 4, 5 and 9 were not thoroughly / accurately addressed.  Content focusing on the specific types of elder abuse; who are the most common perpetrators, and the four requirements for reporting elder abuse would have greatly improved performance on the quiz.”

It takes conscious thought and effort to develop this communication philosophy but take it from me ….. it most often does defuse the “heated moment” and directs attention to the issue at hand. 

Julie

 

 

What did you say? Pay attention!

As we begin another semester, how many times will you find yourself uttering the following:  Are you listening?  Pay Attention!

How do we focus on the Now or even be conscious of it, since neuroscientist, Dr. Bruce Lipton in his book, The Power of Belief,  maintains that 95% of our lives are spent in the unconscious mode as opposed to the critical, conscious mode of presence to the moment.  Continue reading

An Apologia for Thinking Critically and Creatively

Before I take leave upon my 17 years as a facilitator of learning, one of my favorite courses that I loved to offer as a challenge to the human mind, Thinking Critically and Creatively, is being phased out of the curriculum by the summer of 2018.  Before this fundamentally seminal course for any other course or program becomes merely a whimper in the halls of academia, there is a chorus line of students singing its praises: Continue reading