Do You Have a Plan For the Future?

Have you given any thought to your wishes regarding….

  • What health care services you would choose to receive if you became incapacitated?
  • What life-support means to you?
  • What kind of medical treatment you would want if you were close to death?
  • What kind of medical treatment you would want if you were in a coma and not expected to wake up?
  • What kind of medical treatment you would want if you sustained permanent, severe brain damage and were not expected to recovery?
  • Who would make these decisions for you in the event that you could not?

If you were close to death:

  • How comfortable do you want to be?
  • How do you want people to treat you?
  • What do you want your loved ones to know?

If not, know you are not alone. A 2014 study by the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that nearly 2/3rd of Americans did not any form of advanced directive. In other words, only 26% of Americans did have advanced directives in place. In addition, it is important to note that at the time of death, only half of us are able to make our own decisions.

An advanced directive is a legal document that states your medical wishes in the event you are unable to express them and includes a living will and power of attorney for healthcare.    An alternative advanced directive is the “Five Wishes” document which is legal in a majority of states and can be found at this link: https://www.agingwithdignity.org/five-wishes.

Advanced Directives Work

Completing and advanced directive is only the first step in getting your affairs in order. Please do take the time to visit this link: https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/getting-your-affairs-order. It does an excellent job of helping you “Plan for the Future”.

Truly there is no greater gift a family can receive than that of having your life and death wishes clearly outlined and your personal affairs in order.

This is not about dying, but living the life you wish to live.

Julie

Wellness Event

Marinette campus nursing students hold a wellness event while enrolled in a class titled, Health Promotion. Students work in pairs or trios to bring health related information to other students, as well as faculty an staff who attend the event. Topics are chosen from the Healthy People initiatives and are specific to young and middle age adults. It is a fun and highly engaging event where students work with a population that is different than they typically do as clinical usually is centered around disease processes. Examples of topics include: distracted & impaired driving, stress management, sleep, exercise, nutrition, smoking cessation, eye safety in the workplace, ergonomics, and the list goes on. It has been a great way to bring students together from many different programs.

Summer 1:1 with all students

This summer (and last) I taught (fulltime) Intro to Biochemistry which is mainly taken by students in Nursing pre-program.  Most have not taken College 101 and I have been wanting to incorporate more mentoring and College 101 topics in this introductory course.  I cannot recall a semester when I am not asked to take late assignments or to rearrange an assessment for work- related reasons.  Each semester some students are very surprised by the amount of studying required for our class or the rigor involved.

Try as I have for many years to impart some of these truths, I decided about two years ago to meet with all students 1:1 so they could have an instructor who invites them to share and lets them know we are  willing to help them find answers to questions about NWTC.

I have noticed more interaction among the students after these meetings and I am sure that some meetings also save some students time and effort when they decide to clarify for themselves how to 'do school'.  
I find Starfish to be very helpful too, but not all students know how to use it.  
Sometimes it is easy to think students know where the library/ assessment center/ BATHROOM is located, but I find each summer that not all students have been here before or feel comfortable exploring on their own.   Many transfer students from universities have commented that they love the small classes and personal attention they receive at NWTC.

Everyone has Worth

It is graduation 2016, and we reflect on the significance of this culminating event.  This year, I am reminded of the gifts of knowing, learning, and becoming.  I am reminded of our College values.  Following is something I sent to recent program graduates:

Dear 2016 graduates,

We have spent tremendous time in one another’s company over the past number of years, in courses ranging from Accounting 1 to Payroll, Tax, and Managerial Accounting, and covering topics from basic debits and credits to complex statistical regression analysis.  You have mastered the technical and employability skills so necessary for your success in this field.  Yet, my wishes for you extend far beyond the campus and employment settings.

Do you recall when we discussed the difference between cost and price?  But how about worth?  This is not another accounting lesson, but a parallel to your lives and futures.  It is about one of our most important NWTC values:  Everyone has worth.  Know that each of you is inherently valuable and uniquely significant:  Linda’s good nature, Martha’s tenacity, Becky’s positive, quiet leadership, Sergio’s witty antics, Tanya’s no-nonsense style, Tracy’s gentle spirit, Patrick’s offbeat quirkiness, Nancy’s patience and care, and Jen’s beautiful smile and kind heart.

Transcending academics, maybe the most important knowing is knowing who you are; knowing your identity.  And maybe the most important learning is learning to honor your own merit in the choices you make and people with whom you surround yourselves.  And maybe your most important job is to discover your own humanity; your ability to love and be loved, in respecting others’ humanity.

I hope you value yourselves enough to intuitively protect your humanity and guard your consciousness.  I hope you respect yourselves enough to allow close to you only those who genuinely regard your self-worth and emotional, physical, and spiritual well-being.  And, I hope you are able to embrace the divine worth of yourselves and others in all that you do.

I know I have had the complete privilege of teaching your classes, but I have also learned so much from you.  Thank you for lifting me up this past year and for making my job so very rewarding.

Take good care, and look after yourselves . . . you’re worth it!

Emotional Intelligence and ePerformance

Almost everyone has heard the term emotional intelligence (EI).  We discuss EI at NWTC through College 101 training.  It is described in great detail in Chapter 8 in Skip Downing’s textbook, On Course.  And we recognize “lack” of emotional intelligence with inappropriate student behavior.  However, how do we use emotional intelligence with our own faculty ePerformance?  Continue reading

Encouraging engagement in the classroom

One of the factors that I have found to be successful in creating and developing an engaged classroom is frequent encouragement to the learners and the creation of a SAFE ENVIRONMENT

During a recent class I had a student play the role of a resident in a nursing home with pneumonia.  I asked for a volunteer from the class to be the nurse caring for this patient.  I provided report to this nurse about the patient.  The student who volunteered to be the nurse could “consult w/ other nurses as needed.”  The student then prioritized her assessments.

After the data was collected groups worked together to call the physician regarding the patient.  I role played the physician and each group practiced calling.

Later we debriefed on the scenario-what went well/what could be improved.

The day after I sent the following email to students in the class

“Nursing is an art: and if it is to be made an art, it requires an exclusive devotion as hard a preparation, as any painter’s or sculptor’s work; for what is the having to do with dead canvas or dead marble, compared with having to do with the living body, the temple of God’s spirit? It is one of the Fine Arts: I had almost said the finest of Fine Arts.”

– Florence Nightingale

Kudos to you yesterday….nurse Rachael and nurse Kelsie for being brave and taking an active role in assessing our patient….those who called the doctor and all that participated in analyzing data and developing priority plans of care…you are molding yourselves into the role of the graduate nurse

 

I have found that when I encourage students at regular intervals they begin to stretch their wings and become more and more active in their learning.

 

Encouragement in the online environment….priceless

It seems we too often get wrapped up in the online tasks of grading assignments, checking due dates, answering emails, etc. I recently sent a simple email to an online student commending her on her work and encouraging her to continue her education beyond an Associate Degree. WOW…did that ever open the floodgates for this student. She is pursuing a degree with another technical college in the state and just happened to be in my online course this summer.

To quote “You’re a good instructor, Jane. You make me wish I was at your school to see what the rest of you are like. Keep it up. Too many of you -maybe not at Green Bay- have forgotten what it’s like to be in a student’s shoes. A gentle touch and a kind word get more out of us than backing us in a corner and screaming in our faces does.”

Starfish has been a great start, but even a simple email can really give a student the lift they need!